The home of the Cartophilic Society of Great Britain

July 31

Its time for some more “Notes and News”

Well we have had quite a hectic week, with lots going on, the arrival of the updated flyer for the biggest meeting of the year (our Convention) becoming available, plus news of a huge cigarette card auction which took place today (Friday 30 July). Our advice to you is that you do make time to check in every day and look at the three news feed boxes that start the home page to see what is happening in the card-world, because although we have a dedicated section for news that has slipped silently out of these top three spaces, which you can see at   https://card-world.co.uk/news/   you really want to see the news as soon as it breaks. Especially now that we have several branch and club meetings starting to take place across the country.

So what can you do this week? You may well ask. Well lets start with today….

Saturday July 31, which is National Avocado Day

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You may think the avocado is a modern phenomenon, but here we have an avocado which was first plucked from a packet of cigarettes in 1891 This card is part of A400-120 : USA/N12 “Fruits” series, a set of fifty issued by Allen & Ginter Cigarettes of Richmond, Virginia. The reverse has a printed text giving the set title, and a backlist (a list of all the fruits that formed the series). It also mentions the lithographer, George S Harris & Sons of Philadelphia. However this card was also issued in 1905 as USA/E51, a trade card, by the Hershey chocolate company in a series of twenty cards, also called “Fruits”. So does any reader, worldwide, have one of these they would like to show us ? The e-mail, for this, and all enquiries, comments, and scans, is webmaster@card-world.co.uk

PictureSunday August 1 is Yorkshire Day so greetings to all our friends who live in Yorkshire. May we hope that Yorkshire Branch soon comes back to life and you can meet again.
Now as a little diversion we are going to chat about “A Series of Fifty War Portraits” which was issued in 1916 and is a rather good challenge for type collectors as it can be found with the names of lots of different issuers who were also a mixture of tobacconists and traders. In 1950, fifty were known; in 2003 this had risen to eighty two, and it was stated that “it is thought this series was probably issued by others”.
The reason for mentioning these today is that many of these issuers were in Yorkshire –
the tobacco issuers include J H Clure & Son of Keighley, J. Lomax Cockayne of Sheffield (though they also had interests in brewing), and Tetley of Leeds –
whilst the trade includes lots of places which were cinemas, including The Elite Picture House at Bradford, Londesboro Theatre in Scarborough, The Picture House(s) at Harrogate, Keighley, Leeds and Low Moor – or large halls that were undoubtedly pressed into service to show films like the Assembly Rooms in Leeds, and St. George’s Hall in Bradford. To name but a few! The idea perhaps being that these cards were sold or given away at the performances of war related newsreels or films to raise war funds. But we are not sure.
Anyway if you want a list of the issuers so far known, just email us. And then if you have any that are not listed please email us back with the details. And before I leave the theories about this set, the belief seems to be that the cards were pre-printed with a large space at the bottom of the reverse which was for the issuers names to be printed on; this is supported by the fact that often the name is in a different shade of brown.

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Now Monday August 2 is Assistance Dog Day, however next week is also Assistance Dog Week, we just could not find enough cards to cover the whole week. The first helping dog that comes to most peoples minds is the seeing eye dog, which appears on Barratt – and Baker Wardill tea of Dublin – “Animals in the Service of Man” 14/25, and our card MOL-060 Molassine (Vims) “Dogs at Work” (1970) 24/25 (and this set also contains cards of police dogs, and the St Bernard). The official website of this amazing organisation is https://www.guidedogs.org.uk/ The charity was founded in 1934, though the original test of just four dogs was in 1931. An American version started in 1942, and their first dog, also a German Shepherd, went to a serviceman. Assistance dogs also act as ears for deaf people, alerting them to all kinds of household noises like telephones and doorbells; these dogs can be any breed or any size. Their website is https://www.hearingdogs.org.uk Other ways that dogs assist humans in their work appear in other sets, see if you can sniff them out – one to start you off is Lambert Butler “Interesting Sidelights in the Work of the G.P.O.” (1939) where card 13 shows a dog detecting leaks in the coaxial aerial cables.

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Tuesday
On August 3 1900, Harvey Samuel Firestone founded Firestone Tire and Rubber Co in Akron, Ohio. It is now part of the Japanese brand Bridgestone. They issued several sets of playing cards, which are well worth looking for. And they were the supplier of Formula One tyres from 1950 to 1975, so though you wouldn’t know it, they appear on many sets of sporting cards. Their first victory was in the inaugural Indianapolis 500 in 1911 though it is often recorded that they were briefly under threat of losing the honour because of a protest by the second placed driver who said he had lapped the winner whilst they were mending a puncture. However this story did not appear until many years later; there was no protest at the time. This does not mean it was a race without incident, and sadly it also included the first Indianapolis fatality. This postcard was one of a series of amazing Art Deco images issued at the 1933 Worlds Fair. 

Wednesday August 4 is International Owl Awareness Day, and you can see a whole parliament of owls (for that is indeed their collective name) at
https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/search/index?filters%5Broot-collection%5D=b50ab6f0-c52b-012f-5986-58d385a7bc34&keywords=owl#/?scroll=44
We also thoroughly recommend a visit to  https://www.eagles.org/international-owl-awareness-day/ which may be an American site but has lots of useful advice on how to protect owls and information about them.
And of course, we cannot mention owls without mentioning the most famous owl of modern times, Hedwig, from the Harry Potter saga, who you will find on several cards, including in lenticular form, which appeared within packets of chocolate frogs.
Of course if you were a boy scout, you might have been in an owl patrol which appears in John Player “Boy Scout & Girl Guide, Patrol Signs & Emblems” (1933) 13/50. The owl was chosen because of their stealth in hunting, and their keen sight at night, which would have made them good trackers; sadly, for some reason, a few years ago the owl was not seen as a relevant sign for the modern Boy scout organisation and was in danger of being replaced, but perhaps the arrival of Hedwig has changed all that? Let us know if you are, or were, in an owl patrol.
Also let us know if you recognise our card, with its rather military connotation. Its in our gallery as simply “owl” but I am sure it has a better story than that…

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For Thursday August 5, I must admit that searching for cards to go with National Oyster Day was harder than it looked. Lots of cards show the graceful oyster catcher bird, but few show the oysters it catches. I was temporarily assuaged by spotting John Player “Cries of London”, second series of 25 cards, card 18, which shows an oyster seller, with the cry “twelve pence a peck, oysters”. Peck does not refer to the bite you get when your finger slips whilst you are trying to open the oyster, it is a measure. Then, luckily, I found a few proper oyster cards – Wills “Do You Know”, A series (September 1922) 33/50, which, although primarily relating to the pearl and not the oyster, at least showed the shell – Will’s Wonders of the Sea (1928) 36/50 which shows a starfish opening an oyster – and – Wills “The Sea Shore” (1938) 12/50 – which tells us that British oysters were much esteemed by the Romans. There are several more intriguing oyster cards available to view online; feast your eyes on a Lorillard Novelty at https://i.pinimg.com/736x/0c/68/1a/0c681a73446e7c5ae4386084be1e5700–oyster-shells-oysters.jpg
And a Kinney one at https://img1.iwascoding.com/4/paid/2020/09/22/1E/40BD3A10DEFE0138FA50543D7EF8F2C1.jpg (front) https://img1.iwascoding.com/4/paid/2020/09/22/72/401803D0DEFE0138FA4E543D7EF8F2C1.jpg (back)
plus there is a set of Liebig “Oysters” sadly out of stock, at https://shop.cigarettecards.org/LIEBIG-OYSTERS-FRENCH-3170.htm
Whilst hunting, we also found a fun site on early oyster advertising cards, it’s a bit slow to load but its well worth it – because the pictures are large and great quality https://katelivie.com/blog/2015/12/9/weird-oyster-stuff-oyster-trade-cards

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Friday
If you had been on Dover beach on August 6 1926, you might have seen a young lady coming in from the sea. She was actually not just back from her daily dip, she was an American called Gertrude Ederle, and she had just swum the English Channel, becoming the first woman to make the crossing. Her time was also newsworthy as the 14 hours and 39 minutes broke the record set by Captain Matthew Webb, way back in 1875. Sadly it came at a price; her hearing, poor since childhood, was further damaged during the swim, and she would eventually go entirely deaf. A few other things you might not know are – that did not learn to swim at all until she was nine – that she was only trained in the proper way to swim at the age of fifteen – that just two years later she won a gold and a bronze medal at the 1924 Paris Olympics – and that she taught swimming at the Lexington School for the Deaf. She never married, lived in New York City with several female friends, and lived to the grand age of 98. You will find her on B.A.T. “Who`s Who in Sport” (1926) 14/50, Godfrey Phillips Ltd “Speed Champions” (1930) 27/30, which gives her age (eighteen) plus the fact that she beat the previous record time by nearly two hours, and Topps “Scoop” (1954) 72/78.

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And now we must swim backwards against the tide to our next splash into cartophilic magazines of the past. This week we have reached issue three of the London Cigarette Card Company`s “Cigarette Card News”, December 1933.

Cigarette Card

W.D. & H.O. Wills (1933) ‘Arms of Public Schools, 1st Series’

One of the first things that strikes me is the fact that the “New Issues” column bemoans the fact that there are “no actual new issues to report this month”. It says that one of the problems is that Wills are issuing miniature playing cards in most of their brands. Now these did indeed occupy packets for two years, from 1932 to 1934, there were nine different printings within the UK and seven printings in Ireland. However I am not sure about our readers, but I see very few of these, so where did they all disappear to? He complains that “Garden Flowers” has been “circulating for over two months” (which explains why I see so many of these). This was the first set, not the Richard Sudell, nor the two series of New Varieties, as these were issued in 1938-39. The author, who was C.L. Porter by the way, also says that he hears “on good authority” that once the Carreras and Gallaher “coupons” have finished, they will be replaced by cards, and he hoped “the Imperial, U.K., and Phillips … will follow.” He thought that would make for “an interesting time”. suit. The only other cards that were currently in packets were United Kingdom Tobacco Co., Ltd. “Cinema Stars”, and two Wills large sized sets, “Arms of the Public Schools” (which would be the first series, issued in August 1933) and “Cathedrals” (February 1933).

Ogdens Ltd. (1932) ‘Smugglers & Smuggling’ O100-572

Their monthly competition seems to have been a great idea that did not take off. It actually admits that though there was a smaller amount of sets to pick from, picking a winner was harder as only two people managed to get three sets in the right place and these shared the prize money, each getting a voucher for five shillings. As far as second place this was split between the five entrants who got two sets right; they each got a voucher for a shilling. The strange thing about competitions, and I am sure it happened here as well, is that somebody probably got four sets right and thought it was not worth sending it in. Anyway the piece then says “Owing to the extreme pressure on our space, we are not holding a competition this month. We shall resume this feature in January, with an entirely new departure.” The correct order was not given. But next week we will see what the new contest was! Then there was an “Important Announcement”. The cost of producing the magazine had risen, and subscriptions must be raised. However, there was some other news; they were now able to offer, from stock, two much sought after sets, Ogden “Smugglers and Smuggling” and Westminster “Australia” first series at two shillings a set.

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well the theme of this week`s Cards of the Day was the Festival of Archaeology,
which you can read all about at : https://new.archaeologyuk.org/festival-of-archaeology

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Starting with Saturday 24 July we had G075-125 [tobacco : UK] Gallaher “Association Football Club Colours” (1910) 82/100 – You see, modern archaeology is not just concerned with pyramids and ancient structures, it covers industrial sites and even football grounds, like the pitch of this long gone team which was the subject of an archaeological dig recently, as you can read at
https://www.culture24.org.uk/history-and-heritage/archaeology/art536429-archaeology-bradford-park-avenue-heritage-open-days-yorkshire
I have to say this is a very attractive set. The subject of this card, Charles Milnes, had been born in Manchester in 1885, joined Grimsby Town, and then moved to Bradford Park Avenue between 1907 and 1910, so he was in his final season for them when these cards were issued; he might have even been playing for his next team, Huddersfield Town, whilst these cards were still being extracted from the packets. That wasn’t the end of his moves either as he then moved to Rochdale. He died in 1956.

 

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For Sunday 25 July we picked P644-066 John Player “Counties and their Industries” (July 1914) 8/25. The issue dates of this set are very suspect, this numbered version was thought to have been issued in 1914, but according to the company`s own records they were not issued until November 1919. Yu can get un-numbered cards as well, which were issued earlier, and at the time of our original checklist style reference books (of which John Player was issued in 1950), it was stated that the date of issue of those unnumbered cards was not known, but it is now believed to have been in about 1910. Now the reason this card is here is because it actually features on a 1989 PPS silk first day cover about industrial archaeology; the Cornwall card from this set was used on another cover. Maybe more were? Do let us know. There is a fascinating website about these first day covers at: https://firstdaycovercollection.weebly.com/pps-sothebys-cigarette-card-silks.html

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Our last clue card, on Monday 26 July was C504-675 [tobacco : UK] W.A. & A.C. Churchman “Treasure Trove” (August 1937) 3/50 – this being an actual excavation at Verulamium, near St. Albans. This set was issued in two formats; this standard sized set of fifty cards, and a large sized set of just twelve cards. Strangely the small sized set was issued first, and by quite a long way, in 1935. The back of this card is very interesting to students of archaeology because it actually mentions Dr. R. E. Mortimer Wheeler, Keeper of the London Museum. And you can read all about his excavations at Verulamium at: https://www.stalbanshistory.org/category/archaeology/the-roman-city-of-verulamium

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For Tuesday 27 July we opted for C504-575 [tobacco : UK] W.A. & A.C. Churchman “Legends of Britain” (August 1936) 21/50 this being the legend of Callow Pit, specially for Norfolk Day. You can read more about this legend at https://www.edp24.co.uk/news/weird-norfolk-caollow-pit-folklore-1497222 Like our previous set, this was also issued in a large sized set of just twelve cards, but the difference is that both versions were issued in the same month (August 1936)
Norfolk Day started in 2018 as a project of BBC Radio Norfolk and the Eastern Daily Press. Most counties now do have a special day, if you don’t know yours have a look at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_county_days_in_the_United_Kingdom

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Wednesday 28 July
CAD-690 [trade : UK] Cadet Sweets “Treasure Hunt” (1966) 6/25 – this set sounds more like it is to do with pirates than archaeologists, but it is a good a mixture of the two, and skilfully not only introduces proper archaeology to its youthful target audience, but makes it as exciting as any other kind of buried treasure. This card we selected actually deals with Tutenkhamen`s treasure, which, as the reverse tells us, was discovered in 1922. The card actually contains an error, note that instead of saying “sarcophagus” it says “sarcophogns”, can you spot it? This image might be a bit small so I might add an enlargement. So was there a corrected card issued or is this it. This scene does not look familiar to me from the news footage, so I think it was drawn with a fair bit of artistic license. By the way this set first appeared in our original British Trade Index part two as CAF-16

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Thursday 29 July we thought we would continue with the Egyptology theme and bring you 
W800-290 [tobacco : UK] A & M Wix “This Age of Power and Wonder” (1935) /250) Now though Wix had branches in London, England, and Johannesburg, South Africa, it does appear in the UK section of popular dealers` catalogues, so that`s why we code it as “UK”.

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Friday 30 July
Brooke Bond “The Wonderful World of Kevin Tipps” (1995) 2/30 – too new to have a code in our British Trade Index – and this being Stonehenge, a good closing point as it looks to the past, and also to the future, as its a rather nifty link to our Convention, which we really hope will at last take place in October this year.
On which note, have you seen the flyer on our front page yet? Remember if you are already packed and ready to start driving we have lots of space on this site for you to put out feelers for those rare cards you are looking for on the day, or source out who has the best deal on those heavy items you would like to take advantage of stocking up on. If you are stalling out, please get in touch to take advantage of our free section where you can advertise your presence, tell of what you sell, and show off any plums you have been saving for the event. We can also fit pictures in if you send a scan in jpeg format. And you can change that text and pictures as much as you like. So don’t hold back.

 


well sadly we have again reached closing time –
another change this week, as we have large pictures for the cards of the day, complete with backs.
If we get more time next week we may do this for the top section as well…..

dont forget if you missed last week`s newsletter, or are a new reader,
last weeks newsletter is still available at https://card-world.co.uk/newsletter/july-23/ 

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